1/72 Scale N1K Kyofu / Shiden Batch Build Part VII

Finished!  This turned into a “just one more thing” build and seemed to drag on, but the first seven completions for 2020 are done and I’m generally happy with how they turned out.  The big pictures on the computer highlighted a few tweaks and touch ups which are needed but they’re mostly complete.  Here’s the list of modifications and details added, some kits required more of these than others:

  • Cockpits replaced and/or detailed.
  • Instrument panels, side consoles, and seatbelts printed on photographic paper.
  • Engines replaced and/or wired.
  • Wheelwells removed, deepened, and detailed.
  • Landing gear covers replaced with card stock.
  • Landing lights made from CD case plastic.
  • Gear down indicators made from bronze rod.
  • Vacuform or plunge molded canopies.
  • Pitot tubes made with metal tube and insect pins.
  • Beading wire brake lines.
  • Wheels replaced.
  • Turned brass cannon barrels from Master.
  • Various openings and trestle ports drilled out.
  • Trim tab actuators replaced with wire.
  • Radio aerials made from Uschi elastic line.
ShidenBatch_61
One of the Hasegawa Shiden-Kai with several of the added details visible.  I am always really impressed with the Master gun barrels.  They are inexpensive, sturdy, and the proper thickness – an easy way to make a noticeable improvement.  Also visible are the gear down indicators, replacement landing gear covers, vacuform canopy, and a peek at the cockpit details.
ShidenBatch_62
The Hasegawa Kyofu floatplanes are very nice kits.  Fit of the parts was excellent and only required a small bit of sanding to eliminate seams.  The boarding ladders and beaching gear are a nice touch.  I wanted to build the prototype because of the counter-rotating propellers.  Like everybody else, the Japanese were not able to work the bugs out of this system and they reverted to a standard three-bladed propeller for the production aircraft.
ShidenBatch_63
This is the foundling, the MPM kit hiding along with another kit bought at the model show and forgotten.  This is a rather crude molding, but I was pleasantly surprised that it built up well with a lot of work and replacement parts.  Tail codes are from an Aviaeology sheet (try remembering how that one’s spelled!) and the Hinomaru are masked.
ShidenBatch_64
The best kit of the batch is Tamiya’s N1K1.  It was easy to assemble and well detailed, typical Tamiya quality.  This was the only kit which had passable wheelwells, really all I added were surface details.  For the pedantic the only two things which could be corrected are the oil cooler support should be wider and the inner section of the wheel well should be open to the spar.  The N1K1 was the first version adapted from the Kyofu into a land-based fighter.
ShidenBatch_65
The Aoshima Shiden are nice kits but are often overlooked.  This is the N1K1 with the redesigned wing incorporating all four Type 99 20 mm cannon internally.  The kit has shallow wheelwells but a passable cockpit.  The clear parts are a strong point and the canopy can be posed in the open position.  The gear doors do need replacing as they are thick and molded into the landing gear legs – an odd choice for such a nice kit.
ShidenBatch_66
The Shiden-Kai saw the wings lowered from the middle to the bottom of the fuselage and resulted in the ultimate version of the design evolution.  These two are made from the 1977 Hasegawa kit, and have the typical Hasegawa shortcomings of their time – basic cockpit, crude engine, and laughably shallow wheelwells.  They also display a shape error concerning the width of the vertical fin, Kawanishi produced both a broad- and narrow-fin N1K2, Hasegawa’s kit splits the difference and so has to be modified to properly represent either version.  Still buildable kits with a little extra effort.

 

So, overall a fun build but one which took longer than anticipated.  I think the next batch will be something a little more current, hopefully one which doesn’t need as many modifications!

12 thoughts on “1/72 Scale N1K Kyofu / Shiden Batch Build Part VII

      1. I have noticed that my shade of green is way off with the Aichi Val I had built. It will stay that shade though… I really enjoy how you made these model kits shine. Now the problem is where do you display all of this? That’s the problem I am having with my builds all over the place…

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      2. The colors are hard to pin down. Each Japanese manufacturer had their own shade, and many of the IJA aircraft were camouflaged at depots. The Shinden-Kai were manufactured at five different facilities and each may very well have used a different mix. The Illiad chips have colors for Mitsubishi, Kawanishi, and Nakajima but not Aichi. The Illiad chips do not match the Mr. Color paints. I’m skeptical of any “authority” who claims to know absolutely what the colors were. The exceptions to that are Mikesh and Baker, who took actual measurements, or Landsdale who compared chips to a large collection of artifacts.

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