Douglas C-47 / R4D Skytrain / Dakota Color Photographs Part II

42-100646 displays one of the more extremely faded paint jobs. She was assigned to the 47th Troup Carrier Squadron and is seen in Germany just after the war.

C47_12
A formation of C-47’s showing various degrees of wear. The vertical stabilizer appears to have faded more rapidly, likely the assembly was painted with a different Olive Drab paint formulation by a sub-contractor, similar to the B-17. The wing in the foreground shows details of the weathering.

C47_13
The same formation as the photo above. The factory Olive Drab finish on some of the C-47’s has shifted to a variety of browns and buffs.

C47_14
The C-47 was also utilized as a glider tug, seen here towing the Waco CG-4 Hadrian.

C47_15
Paratroopers of the 555th Parachute Infantry Battalion prepare to board a C-47. The “Triple Nickles” were a segregated unit utilized as “smoke jumpers” in the Pacific Northwest. Their mission was to extinguish fires set by Japanese Fu-Go incendiary balloons, 9,300 of which were released during the winter of 1944-45.

C47_16
Paratroopers don their parachutes. 43-48910 displays extensive fading and the remnants of the code “CK –“ on the fuselage aft of the cockpit.

C47_17
Lieutenant Clifford Allen smiles for the camera. Each paratrooper carried 150 feet of rope to enable them to descend safely in the event their parachute became tangled in trees or the mountainous terrain.

C47_18
Troop Carrier Command C-47’s bank over the Oregon back country.

C47_19
A close up of the nose of C-47 42-92095 showing details of the Troop Carrier Command insignia and nose art. The number “442” has replaced at least two previous identifiers.

C47_20
This is the nose of 43-48910, also seen in previous photographs. The “CK –“ code behind the cockpit is visible, as are the remains of other codes under the Troop Carrier Command insignia. These aircraft would make for interesting modeling subjects!

5 thoughts on “Douglas C-47 / R4D Skytrain / Dakota Color Photographs Part II

  1. Jeff,
    Great color shots in Part I and Part II, many of which I’ve never seen before. You might want to correct the title though from “Dakoda” to “Dakota” on both.
    Regards, Paul

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Again, great shots! I’m looking forward to my first OD build, and I’ve been trying to think about how I want to portray that weathering. While quite a bit can be done with paint and airbrush, I’m thinking oil paint filters/dots would be a potential candidate. Thoughts?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think you’re on the right track. Different shades of OD on different components, then filters and weathering. Some of the aircraft show lots of tonal variation so I don’t think you could go wrong even at the extreme end.

      Like

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