Supermarine Spitfires of the 7th Photographic Reconnaissance Group Color Photographs Part II

Here are more photographs of American Spitfire Mark XI from the 7th Photographic Reconnaissance Group, 14th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron at Mount Farm, Oxfordshire, England in 1944. MB 946 has an impressive mission tally. The lighter hue of the PRU Blue on the fuselage where the upper portion of the invasion stripes have been removed is worth noting.
Ground crew are used as human sandbags to keep the tail down as the engine of this Spitfire is run up. The concrete disk visible in the foreground is an anchor used to tie down the wings of the aircraft.
A beautiful view of “My Darling Dorothy”, PA892. Wheel hubs were finished in either the PRU Blue or natural Aluminum, as seen here.
Another view of “My Darling Dorothy”. An unusual feature is that it appears the outline of the U.S. national insignia has been overpainted in PRU Blue instead of the prescribed Insignia Blue.
Diorama bait as the Spitfires are being refueled. Note the row of bicycles to the right.
“Marcella” warming her engine prior to take-off.
Another view of “Marcella” heading towards the runway. In the background is a Cletrac M2 towing tractor.
MB950 showing several touch-ups to her PRU Blue finish. Her wheel hubs are also PRU Blue, the white stripes are there to indicate if the tire has slipped on the wheel.

All photographs credit Imperial War Museum, Freeman collection, Robert Astrella photographer

Part I here: https://inchhighguy.wordpress.com/2022/07/13/supermarine-spitfires-of-the-7th-photographic-reconnaissance-group-color-photographs/

11 thoughts on “Supermarine Spitfires of the 7th Photographic Reconnaissance Group Color Photographs Part II

  1. Those PRU Blue color differences are the result of different film and the oddities of color print and slide developing process back then. It’s highly unlikely the colors are as different as the faulty film developing would have you believe.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. PRU Blue was notorious for fading, it showed every touch-up or buffing as well. There is also the possibility that the Spitfires were touched up with one of the US Synthetic Haze paints given the 7th operated F-5s. Lots of tonal variations are visible in the same photograph. Replicating the finish would make a nice challenge for a skilled modeler.

      Liked by 2 people

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