Soldier Dogs Audiobook Review

Soldier Dogs: The Untold Story of America’s Canine Heroes

By Maria Goodavage, Narrated by Nicole Vilencia

Audiobook, 8 hours 6 minutes

Published by Blackstone Audio, Inc.

Language: English

ASIN:  B007KFNVMM

Soldier Dogs describes the lives and experiences of Military Working Dogs and their handlers in the U.S. Armed Forces.  It details the dogs’ acquisition process, screening, training, medical care, deployments with their handlers, and eventual retirement.  This is augmented by interviews and anecdotes from those involved in the training and combat deployments which adds a human (and canine) perspective and keeps the narrative interesting.

The dogs receive specialized training and are categorized based upon their abilities.  Many of these take advantage of the dogs’ exceptional sense of smell, such as explosives detection, tracking, and narcotics.  There are also patrol dogs which would be the equivalent of “guard” or “attack” dogs.  Dual-purpose dogs combine the two.  The two most common MWD breeds are Belgian Malinois and German Shepherds, although many other breeds are used as well.  Altogether, there are approximately 13,000 dogs serving with U.S. forces.

There were several details which surprised me in this book.  The majority of the dogs are purchased from European breeders, who also give them their names.  The dogs are usually not purebreds for health reasons.  After passing their screenings they receive an alphanumeric tattoo in their left ear which becomes the equivalent of their last name.  The dogs are considered “equipment”, and are assigned to different handlers for each deployment.  They are generally not housebroken because they live in the field with their handlers or in kennels on bases.

I enjoyed this book.  The dogs bond with their handlers, and often become the unofficial mascot of the units the dog teams are attached to.  For the soldiers they are considered comrades, sharing the same food and foxholes as the other members of the unit.  Recommended for both military history buffs and dog enthusiasts.

Pavla Curtiss AT-9 Jeep Build Part II

The wings and horizontal tail planes are butt-jointed and required some filling and blending. I filled the wing seams with superglue and Mr. Surfacer 500, the tailplanes were filled with Perfect Plastic Putty.
The canopy was vacuformed from a soft plastic. An experiment with the excess sheet on the spare canopy revealed that sanding scratches could not be polished out, which negated my usual technique of blending the canopy and then polishing the transparencies clear again. A self-inflicted problem seen here I have managed to reverse the orientation of the landing gear legs, the pins should point outwards.
The model got a coat of Mr. Surfacer 1000 and any imperfections were sanded out. Most of this effort was focused around the canopy and wing roots, I was never quite satisfied with the canopy seam. The NMF finish is Alclad Candy Apple Base over their black primer. The landing gear legs were cut off, pinned, and put in their proper places.
The wing walk areas were masked off and painted with Mr. Color Tire Black. The Alclad finish is hard enough that the paint will stand up to masking if you don’t go overboard with it.
There is no aftermarket for the AT-9, so the kit decals were used. These performed perfectly. If you’re not comfortable with the NMF finish, there are markings for an Olive Drab over Neutral Gray scheme as well.
The finished product. I’m not entirely satisfied with this effort, I had trouble blending the canopy in particular. I do like the lines of the AT-9. The limited-run kits take extra work, but allow you to improve your modeling skills and build some interesting and lesser-known types.

More completed pictures here: https://inchhighguy.wordpress.com/2022/02/22/pavla-curtiss-at-9-jeep-in-1-72-scale/

Women Warriors 127

ww505_USN_MAA
US Navy Master at Arms
ww505b_Sweden
Sweden
ww505c_Denmark
Danish Navy
ww505d_BelgianCrownPrincessElisabeth
Belgian Crown Princess Elisabeth
ww505e_Columbia
Columbia
ww505g_Poland
Poland
ww506_IDF
IDF
ww507_Norway
Norway
ww508_WASP
WASPS
ww508Poster
ww305
IDF
ww306
Poland
ww307
Ukrainian army with T-55
ww308
US Navy WAVE Ensign
Poster077
ww105
IDF
IDF Canine Handler
ww107
IDF Merkava MBT
ww108
ATA with 3.7 AAA gun
Poster027

To see more Women Warriors, click on the tags below:

Women Warriors 118

ww469_IDF
IDF
ww469b_Russia
Russia
ww469c_Ukraine
Ukraine
ww469d_IDF
IDF
ww469e_Lithuanian_Iron Wolf_Mechanized Brigade
Lithuanian Iron Wolf Mechanized Brigade
ww469g_RoyalNavyEngineeringOfficer
Royal Navy Engineering Officer
ww470_IDF
IDF
ww471_Norway
Norway
ww472_First_ATA_pilots_TigerMoth
First ATA pilots with Tiger Moth
ww472Poster
ww269
US Navy
ww270
IDF
ww271
USMC Sea Cobra Pilot
ww272
WRENs moving submarine torpedo at Portsmouth, 29SEP43
Poster068
ww069
IDF
ww070
USAF F-16 pilot Major Wendy Hendrick
ww071
IDF
ww072
ATA pilots with Hurricane
Poster018

To see more Women Warriors, click on the tags below:

By Way of Introduction

Forsake hope all ye who enter. Here be Dragons.

… and Tamiya, and Eduard, and Revell, and Airfix. So nothing really dangerous save the occasional slip of the Xacto knife.  Nothing of general interest to average folk either, but if you are one of the modeling fraternity then hopefully you will find these pages enjoyable.  I have had an interest in modeling as long as I can remember, and a corresponding interest in military history.  Early on I focused on 1/72 scale due to the wide variety of subjects available in that scale and my desire for commonality.  The name “Inch High” is a reflection of that, a six foot tall man is an inch high in a 1/72 world.

With the desire for accuracy comes the need for research, modelers tend to collect reference material by the truckload. I am but one example of that among many.  Half the fun of a modeling project is the research.  When I come across a particularly useful reference I will cite it, when I can I will offer a brief review.  Hopefully I will be able to present some material which is new to many readers, and also to dispel some persistent misconceptions.  Much of what you will see here is the result of my own curiosity and efforts to research a potential modeling project.  Sometimes that results in a model, sometimes it simply results in interest in another rabbit hole.

The internet has opened up additional avenues for research. History must be preserved in order to be understood, and the internet affords a remarkable opportunity to enhance our knowledge.  I believe in the legal doctrine of Fair Use, but I also believe in attributing due credit wherever possible and acknowledging the research of others, along with any historical information regarding the time, place, or military service members involved.

Errors or omissions are my own, but they can be corrected. I will edit posts as needed to correct any factual errors or include amplifying information.  If you notice a problem please contact me,  my desire is accuracy.

Happy modeling!

– Jeff