2021 Cincinnati IPMS Model Show

Yesterday was the 2021 Cincinnati IPMS Model Show, after skipping a year due to the recent unpleasantness.  This year the show was hosted in a new venue, amongst the aircraft of the Tri-State Warbird Museum.  There have been a number of shows scheduled recently in IPMS Region 4, with three shows in Ohio in three sequential weekends – Dayton, Columbus, and Cleveland.  The Cincinnati show saw 317 entries, one has to wonder if attendance wasn’t hurt by having so many shows scheduled so close together.  I stuck around after the show to get some pictures of the warbirds.  Great to “talk shop” with fellow modelers and to see all the great work on display!

Mike and Dave of Plastic Model Mojo were there recording their fiftieth show. Plastic Model Mojo here: https://www.plasticmodelmojo.com/

Women Warriors 141

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IDF
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IDF
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Poland
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US Navy submarine officer
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Italian Navy
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Sweden
Women in israel defense forces IDF military girls
IDF
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US Army
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Mary Tully, Nina Hosington, Blanche Chengnon, Marie Provencher, and Agnes Kelley, members of the first Women’s Death Battalion, Lowell Massachusetts 1917
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US Navy
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IDF Dog Handler
Norway
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US Army WACs
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IDF
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France

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Germany
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ATS Plotters, Coastal Artillery at Dover
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First to Fight Sd.Kfz. 247 Build in 1/72 Scale

This is the First to Fight kit number PL1939-059 molding of the Sd.Kfz. 247 Ausf. A, a newer kit first released in 2018. It is a rather uncommon type which was not produced in large numbers and was rarely seen in later campaigns. Only twenty were produced.
The parts layout is straightforward. The suspension is simplified which speeds construction. Unless you’re planning on showing the vehicle on its side this should not be a problem. The kit includes two crew figures, which are always welcome.
I am planning on modeling this one as an abandoned vehicle, so I’ll be opening up the doors and the driver’s visor. Here I have removed the doors from the body and begun chain drilling the visor. This will be opened up with an exacto knife.
The doors are in upper and lower sections to account for the kink in the hull. I replaced the handles on the pioneer tools as these were molded with undercuts to clear the mold. Fender indicators are insect pins.
Another view after priming with Mr. Surfacer 1000. Towing hooks were made from wire and added front and back.
The basic camouflage during the Polish campaign was Panzer Gray with Brown covering 1/3 of the vehicle. In grayscale there is little difference between the two colors so this is often unnoticed in black and white photographs.
A finished picture after decals and weathering. The model was given a black wash followed by a tan mud wash, then a thin layer of “dust” was sprayed over the whole thing. The rolled-up tarp is made from masking tape.

Fine Molds Messerschmitt Bf 109F-4 of Walter Schuck in 1/72 Scale

Walter Schuck was assigned to JG 5 “Eismeer” on the Arctic Front, scoring his first victory (a MiG-3) on 15MAY42.  The Soviets fielded a number of Lend-Lease types supplied by the Western Allies in this theater, many of Schuck’s victories were over P-39 Airacobras, P-40 Warhawks, Hawker Hurricanes, and A-20 Bostons, along with a mix of Soviet types.  On 15JUN44 he was credited with his 100th victory, two days later was his most successful day, being credited with twelve victories.  On 16FEB45 he shot down two RAF P-51 Mustangs, bringing his score with JG 5 to 198.

Schuck was then transferred to the west to fly the Messerschmitt Me 262 jet fighter with JG 7.  He continued to add to his score.  On 10APR45 he intercepted a formation of American B-17 Flying Fortresses, downing four.  He was then shot down in turn by a P-51 of the 55th FS, 20 FG flown by Lt. Joseph Petersburs.  Schuck bailed out but sprained both ankles upon landing, his war was over at that point.  He was credited with 206 victories.

The model is finished as the winter camouflaged Bf 109F-4 flown by Walter Schuck, 9. / JG 5, Petsamo, Finland, Winter 1942-43

Martin B-26 Marauder Color Photographs Part V – 387th Bomb Group

“Mississippi Mudcat” was assigned to the 387th Bomb Group, 559th Bomb Squadron. She had a long career, completing 149 missions but was shot down by Bf 109s on 23DEC44. Serial number 41-31657, code TQW.
This is “Heavenly Body”, a B-26B assigned to the 387th Bomb Group, 558th Bomb Squadron. She was shot down by flak over Grimbosq, France on 08JUN44. Serial number 41-31664, code KXA. Modelers note the contrasting chipped areas – rivet heads, gun fairings, and nose wheel door and that the nose shows signs of repainting.
41-31677 was assigned to the 556 Bomb Squadron and named “Jisther” by her crew. The name was carried in the same script on both sides of the nose. The starboard side also carried the wolf’s head artwork seen here …
… while the port side carried Stork artwork and an impressive scoreboard. “Jisther” completed 95 missions. On 06AUG44 she was involved in a take-off incident when a flare was accidently discharged into the cockpit, hitting the pilot 1st. Lt. James H. Brantley. Brantley exited the aircraft but was struck and killed by the propeller. “Jisther” continued taxiing and crashed into a hanger and was written off.
Seen at her home field of Chipping Ongar in 1944, “Hangover Hut” displays an impressive scoreboard. She completed a total of 152 missions, and was one of the few Marauders who flew on the 556th Bomb Squadron’s first mission on 31JUL43 and survived to fly on the last on 17APR45. Serial number 41-31694, code FWF.
Serial Number 41-31696 was named “Roughernacob” by her crew. On her 111th mission on 12AUG44, she was hit by flak and lost fuel. Unable to return to England, she crash landed near an airfield in France. Her crew survived the crash but the aircraft was written off.
This is Serial Number 41-31900, coded FWT of the 556th Bomb Squadron. Proving there is no name too unusual for a USAAF crew, they have named her “Short Snorter”.
“Lucky Lady” flew her first mission for the 387th Bomb Group’s 556th Squadron on 21APR44. Her serial number was 41-35062, side codes FWN.
“Lucky Lady” did not live up to her name. On 21MAY44, only a month after her first mission, she experienced a total instrument failure upon take-off. Immediately returning to Chipping Ongar, she clipped another Marauder and ran off the end of the runway. Ultimately, she was written off. The 387th Bomb Group’s distinctive “tiger stripes” are visible on the tail.
“The Big Hairy Bird” is well-known for her outlandish nose art and is a favorite of modelers. Not so well known is that she was originally assigned to the 397th Bomb Group (with diagonal tail stripe), and later transferred to the 387th Bomb Group (tiger stripes) as seen here. Her serial number was 42-96165, while with the 387th she wore side codes KXT.
The 556th Squadron’s “Top Sarge II” wore fuselage code FWJ. She completed an even 100 missions, and flew on the Squadron’s last sortie on 26APR45. The mission was aborted three minutes into the flight when it was reported that the target area had been overrun by U.S. troops as the German resistance collapsed.
Seen at St. Simon – Clastres, France in 1945 is 43-34119 “Off Limits” of the 558th Bomb Squadron. She was written off shortly after the war after crashing on 20MAY45 in Jumet, Belgium.

The Coral Sea 1942 Book Review

The Coral Sea 1942: The first carrier battle

Osprey Campaign Series Book 214

By Marke Stille, Illustrated by John White

Softcover in dustjacket,  96 pages, profusely illustrated, index

Published by Osprey Publishing, November 2009

Language: English

ISBN-13: 978-1-84603-440-4

Dimensions: 7.4 x 0.2 x 9.5 inches

The Imperial Japanese Navy planned Operation Mo to seize Port Moresby on the southern coast of New Guinea for the purpose of isolating Australia and threating Allied air bases there.  This would help secure the southern frontier of their Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere and protect their bases at Rabaul.  Supporting the Japanese invasion fleet were the large aircraft carriers Shokaku and Zuikaku and the light carrier Shoho.  American and British signals intercepts warned Admiral Nimitz of the impending operation, and he decided to contest the invasion by sending all four of his available aircraft carriers, although Enterprise and Hornet did not arrive in time to participate in the battle.

The battle was the first naval engagement fought entirely by aircraft.  Although the opposing fleets were often in close proximity they never sighted each other.  The Americans lost the aircraft carrier Lexington, with Yorktown damaged, while the Japanese lost the light carrier Shoho, with Shokaku damaged.  With Zuikaku’s air group depleted the Japanese determined the landings at Port Moresby could not be supported and cancelled the invasion.

Both sides claimed victory.  On the Allied side, the threat to Australia was abated and the Japanese juggernaut was turned back for the first time in the war.  On the other hand, the Japanese thought they had sunk two American carriers.  Their own fleet carriers could be repaired and their air groups replenished, and the IJN would enjoy a two to one superiority in aircraft carriers in the meantime.  In reality, damage to the Yorktown was (quite heroically) repaired in time for her to participate in the Battle of Midway, while neither Zuikaku nor Shokaku were present.

Author Mark Stille has done an excellent job of documenting the events leading up to the Battle of the Coral Sea as well as the play-by-play of the battle itself.  Naval battles are complex affairs, but the graphics-intense format of the Osprey Campaign series shines in making a clear presentation of the ship and aircraft maneuvers.  The length of this work is just enough to present this engagement well.  This is one of the better volumes of this series and well worth picking up.

Women Warriors 140

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Ukraine
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Royal Australian Navy helmsman
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IDF
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Norway
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Italian Alpini on patrol in Afghanistan with VTLM
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US Navy quartermaster
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Russia Emergency Ministry
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IDF
ww560_ATA
ATA
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IDF
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Ukraine with RPG-7
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Belgian F-16 Pilot
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WASPs with B-17 Tail Guns
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Ukraine
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IDF
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Russian Border Guard
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US Navy Nurses WWII
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ICM Sd.Kfz. 222 Build in 1/72 Scale

ICM first released their Sd.Kfz.222 kit in 2005 as kit number 72411, this is the 2011 reboxing. These were often used in the reconnaissance role, and would be just the thing for those times when you’re trapped on a country road behind a slow driver!
The parts are well-molded and the breakdown is conventional. ICM have included photoetch for the engine vent in the hull and the grenade screen atop the open turret. Both of these PE parts are useful and appropriate for the intended applications.
Assembly was quick and the fit was good with no surprises.
The model was primed with Mr. Surfacer 1000 and then base coated with Alclad black primer. Thin coats of Panzer Gray misted on will allow for this to provide darker shadows in the recesses if applied carefully.
Here is the effect of lighter shades thinly misted on over the black base coat. Highlights were picked up with drybrushing.
Here is the finished model with an application of mud and dust. Everything was sealed and unified with Testors DullCoat. The radio antenna is Nitenol wire.